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The Reason Rally 2012 from a Christian Perspective

Eric Hovind March 26th, 2012

What a fascinating day we had at the first-ever Reason Rally in Washington, D.C., where 8,000 to 10,000 atheists gathered to meet like-minded people to show themselves that they exist. As I walked up to the reason rally and saw all the faces of people that were celebrating the blaspheming of God’s name, I was filled with Godly sorrow. I beg God to grant these individuals repentance, so that they could see the truth. (2 Tim 2:25)

Here are the top 10 things I observed as a Christian at the Reason Rally:

10. With more than 8,000 people at their first “church” conference, it’s sure to make a good religious gathering each year.

9. For people that say they don’t believe that God exists, they thought about and talked about God more than most pastors do on Sunday mornings.

8. They accomplished what churches can’t seem to do — by having several denominations of atheists get together for one event.

7. Churches can talk about the Glory of God and people hardly get excited, but the atheist pastors get the congregation to cheer and clap by dropping the F-bomb.

6. Atheists get extremely excited about making fun of someone they say doesn’t exist.

5. They have the same basic outline for a Christian Conference — praise songs, and sermons.

4. Atheists are more than happy to tell you that they don’t know anything.

3. They make fun of Christians for being “sheep,” but when the “High Priest of Atheism” Richard Dawkins got up to speak, they flocked to him and hung onto every word he said.

2. To solidify their version of church service, atheists even had an online offering!

1. Every atheist we interviewed conceded the possibility that God exists.

Overall, I am still confused as to the reason for the reason rally. I guess if it was just to have atheists show up and say “we are here”, it worked, but for a group of individuals that would say “culture determines morality and truth”, I don’t understand why they would try to organize themselves as a group in an attempt to change the culture.